Visual Diff

As an open source hardware shop, we have to contend with some serious limitations when it comes to source control tools. However, this person has come up with a way to do visual diffs of circuit schematics and PCBs using existing tools. All the we need to do is to adapt it to our standard processes. Yeay!

ASH1: Another Milestone

It’s always nice to have a meeting at AESTE. It charges you up and gives you the necessary motivation. If you want to get motivated … AESTE should be your destination where you can see ambitious people pursuing their passion.. For the next phase of my work on ash1. It’s planned to work on the following streams in parallel : Documentation : paper work + documenting + coding style. Integration of Ethernet Operations ash1 Assembler Development. regarding future posts, I Read more…

ASH1: A glance at speed and size

Hi again ! As the goal for ash1 is to make it as small and as fast as possible. I’ve tried to investigate the size and speed features of ash1. As we have seen from the previous post, ash1 is pretty small (~500 FPGA slices)… I guess this is super cool if we compare it with a typical MAC Ethernet IP core (~2800 FPGA slices). Moreover, it’s smaller than AEMB processor core (~1500 slices). So in terms of size, the Read more…

ASH1: FPGA proven!

It has been a while since my last blog … I was busy with my exams and university issues  for about a month. So, here we come again to talk about ash1. Since I have started working on ash1, I was anxiously waiting for the day where I can write a piece of code and test it out on an FPGA device and this is what happened ! On 20th of August, 2011, ash1 executed its first program that I Read more…

Welcome Lunch

I was being informed that my blog posts were too technical until a point that it bored the readers. I felt pity for my supervisor, because he needs to read through all my dull blog posts before publishing them. The reason that I prefer to blog technical stuff is that it is has less restriction in terms of grammar, and also fewer vocabulary is needed. All in all, engineers are trained to write technical stuff, right? Since I’m now having Read more…

uCLinux: Processes in kernel

Processes can be classified as either I/O-bound or processor-bound. As the name suggests, the former is a process where much of the time is spent in waiting for relatively slow I/O operations to complete. For instance, a process taking input for a word processor will be I/O-bound as it spends most of its time waiting for characters input. Such a process is runnable for only short duration, because it is eventually blocked to wait for more I/O. On the other hand, processor-bound process spends most of the Read more…

LLVM: Compiling FreeRTOS with LLVM (Part 2)

Continue from my previous post, LLVM: Compiling FreeRTOS with LLVM (Part 1). Anybody who might have some basic skills in programming, creating Makefiles especially, must be laughing hysterically if they come across and read my previous post in this topic. When I google the phrase “Compiling freertos with llvm” or “freertos llvm”, my post comes out first in the results. I wonder how many read that post. Silly me, pity them. I was laughing at myself and feel embarrassed when Read more…

Village Base Station

Guess what? It’s powered by AESTE technology. Yeay! Shareable recently covered a group of residents of Jalalabad, Afghanistan who built their own open-source wireless network from junk and everyday household items. For the less-industrious yet DIY-inclined, the Village Base Station (pdf) is a low-power, easy to deploy tool developed by Berkeley professor Kurtis Heimerl to create a GSM cellular data network in areas with limited power and network resources. MobileActive recently got their hands on a prototype and tested it Read more…

uCLinux: Multitasking in Linux kernel

Multitasking operating system is a software that offers interleave execution of more than one process. It is capable of executing several processes concurrently and therefore giving an illusion of parallelism in the view of user abstraction. Multitasking operating systems come in two flavors: cooperative multitasking and preemptive multitasking. In cooperative multitasking, a process does not stop running until it is voluntary to do so. As the result, process in a cooperative multitasking system can dominates processor time. Conversely, in preemptive multitasking, a running process is suspended involuntarily so that next process can be Read more…

LLVM: Compiling FreeRTOS with LLVM

It is about two more weeks before my internship at Aeste ends. Yesterday, I finished my task of cleaning up LLVM floating points instructions and cache instructions. What I did was just hunt all these unwanted instructions inside AEMB target directory files and remove it without damaging the files or disrupt any dependencies. That was it, but I am not sure its going to be working or not. Now, come the second part, testing the code by compiling FreeRTOS with Read more…